Isco’s dilemma: Should the playmaker be given more playing time?

Isco_Disco
Isco celebrating his goal against Argentina 

He was once one of the most sought-after young Spanish football talents before agreeing to a €30 million move to Real Madrid in 2013, signing a five-year contract with the club.

The bandy-legged Andalusian playmaker struggled for playing time under Ancelotti in his first two seasons. Despite his struggle for game time, the Spaniard managed 11 goals and seven assists in 44 games* in his first season and four goals and nine assists in 39 games* the following season.

Although Rafa Benítez replaced Ancelotti for the start of the 2015/16 season, Isco continued to struggle for game time but then started to earn some regular play time at the turn of 2016, when Benítez was fired half-way through the season and replaced by Real Madrid and France legend, Zinedine Zidane. The Spaniard finished the season with three goals and ten assists in 42 games* and his second Champions League trophy in three seasons.

The 2016/17 season still didn’t change much in terms of minutes on the field but his significance for Real Madrid was undeniable, with opposing players virtually incapable of defending him. He contributed to the team’s cup double success with his 11 goals and eight assists.

In spite of his lack of minutes over the past four seasons, Isco consistently turned in impressive performances, bamboozling opponents when the opportunity presented itself with his nimble feet and silky smooth dribbling skills. Due to his performances, he was regularly given plaudits and was often compared to his famed coach during his glory days— a praise that also cascaded from the mouth of the French legend himself.

However, with the rise to prominence of his equally impressive yet younger compatriot, Asensio; Isco found himself slipping down the pecking order, becoming essentially a distant memory replaced by a newer, more intriguing one—almost like a child who tosses his older, yet once favourite toy when presented with a newer, shinier and [what appears to be a] more entertaining toy.

Nevertheless, given Isco’s history, his consistency for the national team and Real Madrid’s abysmal season in the league, Zidane should be handing the playmaker far more minutes than he’s been given this season and Isco has made that clear.

After turning in yet another extraordinary performance for the national team—scoring his first hat-trick for Spain, Isco slyly took a swipe at Zidane and in essence alerted clubs interested in him, that he is unhappy with his current club situation and may be available after the World Cup in Russia.

Isco is a special player and he should be an integral part of Real Madrid. When played with regularity—and his performances with Spain demonstrates this—the bow-legged playmaker can conjure up magic in a split second, almost as good as, but not quite like—Messi.

* Copa del Rey appearances weren’t included